I love it when a quote goes around the internet and people are too lazy to actually source who said it, so they opt to go with “Unknown” and call it a day.
It’s a great quote, do some fucking work and attribute it to the person who said it.

I love it when a quote goes around the internet and people are too lazy to actually source who said it, so they opt to go with “Unknown” and call it a day.

It’s a great quote, do some fucking work and attribute it to the person who said it.

caseymalone:

Always reblog

caseymalone:

Always reblog


LETTER TO MIKE:


Hey Mike! I’ve spent this last year trying to figure out the right career for myself and I still can’t figure out what to do. I have always been a hands on kind of guy and a go-getter. I could never be an office worker. I need change, excitement, and adventure in my life, but where the pay is steady. I grew up in construction and my first job was a restoration project. I love everything outdoors. I play music for extra money. I like trying pretty much everything, but get bored very easily. I want a career that will always keep me happy, but can allow me to have a family and get some time to travel. I figure if anyone knows jobs its you so I was wondering your thoughts on this if you ever get the time! Thank you!
- Parker Hall




MIKE’S RESPONSE:


Hi Parker,
My first thought is that you should learn to weld and move to North Dakota. The opportunities are enormous, and as a “hands-on go-getter,” you’re qualified for the work. But after reading your post a second time, it occurs to me that your qualifications are not the reason you can’t find the career you want.
I had drinks last night with a woman I know. Let’s call her Claire. Claire just turned 42. She’s cute, smart, and successful. She’s frustrated though, because she can’t find a man. I listened all evening about how difficult her search has been. About how all the “good ones” were taken. About how her other friends had found their soul-mates, and how it wasn’t fair that she had not.
“Look at me,” she said. “I take care of myself. I’ve put myself out there. Why is this so hard?”
“How about that guy at the end of the bar,” I said. “He keeps looking at you.”
“Not my type.”
“Really? How do you know?”
“I just know.”
“Have you tried a dating site?” I asked.
“Are you kidding? I would never date someone I met online!”
“Alright. How about a change of scene? Your company has offices all over – maybe try living in another city?”
“What? Leave San Francisco? Never!”
“How about the other side of town? You know, mix it up a little. Visit different places. New museums, new bars, new theaters…?”
She looked at me like I had two heads. “Why the hell would I do that?”
Here’s the thing, Parker. Claire doesn’t really want a man. She wants the “right” man. She wants a soul-mate. Specifically, a soul-mate from her zip code. She assembled this guy in her mind years ago, and now, dammit, she’s tired of waiting!!
I didn’t tell her this, because Claire has the capacity for sudden violence. But it’s true. She complains about being alone, even though her rules have more or less guaranteed she’ll stay that way. She has built a wall between herself and her goal. A wall made of conditions and expectations. Is it possible that you’ve built a similar wall?
Consider your own words. You don’t want a career – you want the “right” career. You need “excitement” and “adventure,” but not at the expense of stability. You want lots of “change” and the “freedom to travel,” but you need the certainty of “steady pay.” You talk about being “easily bored” as though boredom is out of your control. It isn’t. Boredom is a choice. Like tardiness. Or interrupting. It’s one thing to “love the outdoors,” but you take it a step further. You vow to “never” take an office job. You talk about the needs of your family, even though that family doesn’t exist. And finally, you say the career you describe must “always” make you “happy.”
These are my thoughts. You may choose to ignore them and I wouldn’t blame you – especially after being compared to a 42 year old woman who can’t find love. But since you asked…
Stop looking for the “right” career, and start looking for a job. Any job. Forget about what you like. Focus on what’s available. Get yourself hired. Show up early. Stay late. Volunteer for the scut work. Become indispensable. You can always quit later, and be no worse off than you are today. But don’t waste another year looking for a career that doesn’t exist. And most of all, stop worrying about your happiness. Happiness does not come from a job. It comes from knowing what you truly value, and behaving in a way that’s consistent with those beliefs.Many people today resent the suggestion that they’re in charge of the way the feel. But trust me, Parker. Those people are mistaken. That was a big lesson from Dirty Jobs, and I learned it several hundred times before it stuck. What you do, who you’re with, and how you feel about the world around you, is completely up to you.
Good luck -Mike
P.S. I’m serious about welding and North Dakota. Those guys are writing their own ticket.
P.P.S. Think I should forward this to Claire?

LETTER TO MIKE:

Hey Mike! I’ve spent this last year trying to figure out the right career for myself and I still can’t figure out what to do. I have always been a hands on kind of guy and a go-getter. I could never be an office worker. I need change, excitement, and adventure in my life, but where the pay is steady. I grew up in construction and my first job was a restoration project. I love everything outdoors. I play music for extra money. I like trying pretty much everything, but get bored very easily. I want a career that will always keep me happy, but can allow me to have a family and get some time to travel. I figure if anyone knows jobs its you so I was wondering your thoughts on this if you ever get the time! Thank you!

- Parker Hall

MIKE’S RESPONSE:

Hi Parker,

My first thought is that you should learn to weld and move to North Dakota. The opportunities are enormous, and as a “hands-on go-getter,” you’re qualified for the work. But after reading your post a second time, it occurs to me that your qualifications are not the reason you can’t find the career you want.

I had drinks last night with a woman I know. Let’s call her Claire. Claire just turned 42. She’s cute, smart, and successful. She’s frustrated though, because she can’t find a man. I listened all evening about how difficult her search has been. About how all the “good ones” were taken. About how her other friends had found their soul-mates, and how it wasn’t fair that she had not.

“Look at me,” she said. “I take care of myself. I’ve put myself out there. Why is this so hard?”

“How about that guy at the end of the bar,” I said. “He keeps looking at you.”

“Not my type.”

“Really? How do you know?”

“I just know.”

“Have you tried a dating site?” I asked.

“Are you kidding? I would never date someone I met online!”

“Alright. How about a change of scene? Your company has offices all over – maybe try living in another city?”

“What? Leave San Francisco? Never!”

“How about the other side of town? You know, mix it up a little. Visit different places. New museums, new bars, new theaters…?”

She looked at me like I had two heads. “Why the hell would I do that?”

Here’s the thing, Parker. Claire doesn’t really want a man. She wants the “right” man. She wants a soul-mate. Specifically, a soul-mate from her zip code. She assembled this guy in her mind years ago, and now, dammit, she’s tired of waiting!!

I didn’t tell her this, because Claire has the capacity for sudden violence. But it’s true. She complains about being alone, even though her rules have more or less guaranteed she’ll stay that way. She has built a wall between herself and her goal. A wall made of conditions and expectations. Is it possible that you’ve built a similar wall?

Consider your own words. You don’t want a career – you want the “right” career. You need “excitement” and “adventure,” but not at the expense of stability. You want lots of “change” and the “freedom to travel,” but you need the certainty of “steady pay.” You talk about being “easily bored” as though boredom is out of your control. It isn’t. Boredom is a choice. Like tardiness. Or interrupting. It’s one thing to “love the outdoors,” but you take it a step further. You vow to “never” take an office job. You talk about the needs of your family, even though that family doesn’t exist. And finally, you say the career you describe must “always” make you “happy.”

These are my thoughts. You may choose to ignore them and I wouldn’t blame you – especially after being compared to a 42 year old woman who can’t find love. But since you asked…

Stop looking for the “right” career, and start looking for a job. Any job. Forget about what you like. Focus on what’s available. Get yourself hired. Show up early. Stay late. Volunteer for the scut work. Become indispensable. You can always quit later, and be no worse off than you are today. But don’t waste another year looking for a career that doesn’t exist. And most of all, stop worrying about your happiness. Happiness does not come from a job. It comes from knowing what you truly value, and behaving in a way that’s consistent with those beliefs.
Many people today resent the suggestion that they’re in charge of the way the feel. But trust me, Parker. Those people are mistaken. That was a big lesson from Dirty Jobs, and I learned it several hundred times before it stuck. What you do, who you’re with, and how you feel about the world around you, is completely up to you.

Good luck -
Mike

P.S. I’m serious about welding and North Dakota. Those guys are writing their own ticket.

P.P.S. Think I should forward this to Claire?

How I feel as a System Admin

feitclub:



Racist chants bellowed from a loudspeaker and Hinomaru flags were waved at a rally in Tokyo attended by about 40 people following a young person dressed in military uniform.
But what set this demonstration apart from the usual protests against Koreans and Chinese were the swastika flags fluttering beside Japan’s national flag.
“We will recover the honor of Imperial Japan and Nazi Germany,” one person shouted, as the protesters marched through a busy entertainment area of the Ikebukuro district.
The rally was held on April 20, the 125th anniversary of the birth of Adolf Hitler.
Although young Japanese protesters have recently increased their use of Nazi symbols in demonstrations, the rallies are not targeted at Jews. In their minds, the demonstrators seem to believe that Hitler was justified in trying to protect the German race from a rising threat, and that Nazi-style persecution offers way to save Japan from the increasing power of China and South Korea.

this this THIS is why history matters. THIS is why you can’t excise the ugly parts of your past and instead focus on teaching your children to love their country.
Because the minute you convince your youths that your country has always been peaceful and great and literally forged by the gods (not kidding) then of course they will react to outside criticism with anger and disbelief. And when people are that clueless they’ll hate anyone who’s different.
Remember this?

In March, a man in his 30s was arrested on suspicion of damaging property by ripping up copies of “The Diary of Anne Frank” at libraries and bookstores in the Tokyo area.
During questioning by Tokyo police, the man said, “I could not forgive the fact that the diary was not written by Anne Frank herself.”
Since February 2013, about 310 copies of the classic work from the young Holocaust victim have been found damaged at 38 libraries in Tokyo.

When the Anne Frank vandalism story broke, before the culprit and motive were known, there were stories written questioning if Japan’s rightward shift was partly to blame. This caused a number of rebuttal pieces that said “oh no, Japan is not and has never been anti-Semitic.”
But you don’t have to be actively anti-Semitic to accept anti-Semitic points of view. Jews in Japan are invisible; there might be a dozen synagogues in the entire country. No one knows of Hanukkah or Yom Kippur. A recent TV segment had to explain at great length what “kosher” meant.
So it doesn’t matter if every Japanese child reads The Diary of Anne Frank in school or if history classes addresses the Holocaust, Jews are still a mystery. And when a group of people are that marginalized, it doesn’t take much to convince members of the general public that said outsiders aren’t to be trusted.
Before anyone jumps to the conclusion that I am in danger, don’t worry. Rallies such as the one described above are rare and no doubt sparsely attended. But on a national scale, it frightens me to think how many people might be out there who, while otherwise being perfectly nice and respectable, have no clue why Adolf Hitler or the Nazis are so scary.

A 23-year-old man who was one of the organizers of the demonstration in Ikebukuro indicated that the group was prepared to take the next step against Koreans and Chinese.
“Anti-Korean and anti-Chinese sentiment has spread through society because we raised our voices,” the man said. “We now want to push forward Nazism.”…
He also suggested that Nazi Germany was justified in killing about 6 million Jews in the Holocaust.
“I believe that was a policy to separate the Jews who had been threatening the lives of ordinary Germans and to protect the pure blood of the German race,” he said. “There are also doubts over whether Anne Frank really wrote her entire diary.”
Ultra-rightists groups have consistently denied that Japan did anything wrong during World War II. They have also gone online to deny the Holocaust and argue that “The Diary of Anne Frank” is a fake.

IT’S ALL CONNECTED. One minute you’re told that your country’s behavior during the war was exaggerated. The next you hear that your country’s biggest ally was also falsely accused of war crimes. So no, Holocaust Denial is not a pillar of the current Prime Minister’s agenda, but the harder he pushes for more “patriotic” history textbooks, the easier he makes it for fringe groups to spread lies about the Chinese, Koreans, Jews, anyone.
Fuck Abe, Fuck Hashimoto, fuck every single Japanese politician who treats the rest of the world like a focus group. Your neighbors matter. Your history matters. Your actions towards minorities living in your country matters. You can foster a greater understanding of other humans or you can rally your base towards jingoism. Don’t make the wrong choice.
Article source http://ajw.asahi.com/article/behind_news/social_affairs/AJ201405010052
Photo is from a different but similar Japanese Nazi rally held in March (Japanese blog)

feitclub:

Racist chants bellowed from a loudspeaker and Hinomaru flags were waved at a rally in Tokyo attended by about 40 people following a young person dressed in military uniform.

But what set this demonstration apart from the usual protests against Koreans and Chinese were the swastika flags fluttering beside Japan’s national flag.

“We will recover the honor of Imperial Japan and Nazi Germany,” one person shouted, as the protesters marched through a busy entertainment area of the Ikebukuro district.

The rally was held on April 20, the 125th anniversary of the birth of Adolf Hitler.

Although young Japanese protesters have recently increased their use of Nazi symbols in demonstrations, the rallies are not targeted at Jews. In their minds, the demonstrators seem to believe that Hitler was justified in trying to protect the German race from a rising threat, and that Nazi-style persecution offers way to save Japan from the increasing power of China and South Korea.

this this THIS is why history matters. THIS is why you can’t excise the ugly parts of your past and instead focus on teaching your children to love their country.

Because the minute you convince your youths that your country has always been peaceful and great and literally forged by the gods (not kidding) then of course they will react to outside criticism with anger and disbelief. And when people are that clueless they’ll hate anyone who’s different.

Remember this?

In March, a man in his 30s was arrested on suspicion of damaging property by ripping up copies of “The Diary of Anne Frank” at libraries and bookstores in the Tokyo area.

During questioning by Tokyo police, the man said, “I could not forgive the fact that the diary was not written by Anne Frank herself.”

Since February 2013, about 310 copies of the classic work from the young Holocaust victim have been found damaged at 38 libraries in Tokyo.

When the Anne Frank vandalism story broke, before the culprit and motive were known, there were stories written questioning if Japan’s rightward shift was partly to blame. This caused a number of rebuttal pieces that said “oh no, Japan is not and has never been anti-Semitic.”

But you don’t have to be actively anti-Semitic to accept anti-Semitic points of view. Jews in Japan are invisible; there might be a dozen synagogues in the entire country. No one knows of Hanukkah or Yom Kippur. A recent TV segment had to explain at great length what “kosher” meant.

So it doesn’t matter if every Japanese child reads The Diary of Anne Frank in school or if history classes addresses the Holocaust, Jews are still a mystery. And when a group of people are that marginalized, it doesn’t take much to convince members of the general public that said outsiders aren’t to be trusted.

Before anyone jumps to the conclusion that I am in danger, don’t worry. Rallies such as the one described above are rare and no doubt sparsely attended. But on a national scale, it frightens me to think how many people might be out there who, while otherwise being perfectly nice and respectable, have no clue why Adolf Hitler or the Nazis are so scary.

A 23-year-old man who was one of the organizers of the demonstration in Ikebukuro indicated that the group was prepared to take the next step against Koreans and Chinese.

“Anti-Korean and anti-Chinese sentiment has spread through society because we raised our voices,” the man said. “We now want to push forward Nazism.”

He also suggested that Nazi Germany was justified in killing about 6 million Jews in the Holocaust.

“I believe that was a policy to separate the Jews who had been threatening the lives of ordinary Germans and to protect the pure blood of the German race,” he said. “There are also doubts over whether Anne Frank really wrote her entire diary.”

Ultra-rightists groups have consistently denied that Japan did anything wrong during World War II. They have also gone online to deny the Holocaust and argue that “The Diary of Anne Frank” is a fake.

IT’S ALL CONNECTED. One minute you’re told that your country’s behavior during the war was exaggerated. The next you hear that your country’s biggest ally was also falsely accused of war crimes. So no, Holocaust Denial is not a pillar of the current Prime Minister’s agenda, but the harder he pushes for more “patriotic” history textbooks, the easier he makes it for fringe groups to spread lies about the Chinese, Koreans, Jews, anyone.

Fuck Abe, Fuck Hashimoto, fuck every single Japanese politician who treats the rest of the world like a focus group. Your neighbors matter. Your history matters. Your actions towards minorities living in your country matters. You can foster a greater understanding of other humans or you can rally your base towards jingoism. Don’t make the wrong choice.

Article source http://ajw.asahi.com/article/behind_news/social_affairs/AJ201405010052

Photo is from a different but similar Japanese Nazi rally held in March (Japanese blog)

IT by day. Everything else by night.

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